Have You Heard?

Ponca City Now - March 27, 2020 12:23 pm

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues, anecdotal stories and experiences begin to emerge. The information overload is unlikely to stop any time soon, so we want to take a moment to remind you about the importance of making sure the information you’re hearing (and sharing) is accurate. 

Here are a few tips for you to ensure you’re hearing or reading the real deal: 

  • Consider the source when receiving text messages or app messages that oversell the authority of the message sender. A friend of a friend who knows someone is probably not a reliable source, so proceed with caution until you can validate it’s credible. 
  • Fact check. Did you read a post that said your local legislator made a decision to “lockdown” your community? Check his or her official page for confirmation before proceeding. 
  • Determine where you want to gather your primary information and stick to that source as your true north. Outside of the OSDH, the CDC and the WHO are the overarching public health experts on COVID-19.  

Misinformation can cause additional fear, anxiety and concern in today’s news cycle. A healthy dose of skepticism will help ensure the information you are receiving, and sharing, is helpful and not harmful. 

 

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