Cookbook commemorates Grand Home’s centennial

Beverly Bryant - October 28, 2016 3:36 pm

 

A cookbook commemorating the centennial of Marland’s Grand Home, featuring recipes provided by residents of Ponca City, has been published and is now available for purchase.

The Friends of Marland’s Grand Home Cook Book is available at two locations — The Emporium and The Cherokee Strip Company (booth 12). Both stores are on Grand Avenue.

Featured in the FMGH Cook Book are recipes from current residents of Ponca City and the Ponca City Cook Book 1919, which includes Mrs. E.W. Marland and other folks from that era.

You will find Mothers Grape Dumplings, Alabama Corn Bread, Bacon Braided Stuffed Wild Turkey, Orecchiettee Pasta with Alfredo Mushroom Sauce, Poor Boy Margarita and  so many more to explore and enjoy.

Included are vintage photos of Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Marland and their first home on Grand Avenue. There also is a brief history called “A Glimpse of Marland’s Grand Home.”

The cookbooks are $20 each and all proceeds go to Friends of Marland’s Grand Home to help maintain the historic home. The Grand Home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The cookbook was created by the Friends of Marland’s Grand Home, including Mindy LittleCook.

“The recipes from folks truly reflect E.W. Marland: The recipes include his love for landscaping, architecture, government, Marland Oil/Conoco/Phillips, artists and writers,” LittleCook said. “The cookbook also reflects the museums that are in Marland’s Grand Home, including the DAR, the 101 Ranch and Native Americans.”

A history of the Marlands and the Grand Home are included in a section of the book titled “A Glimpse of Marland’s Grand Home.”

In 1908 Ernest Whitworth (E.W.) Marland arrived in Ponca City, Oklahoma, in search of oil. In 1911 he finally struck oil on the allotment of Ponca tribal member Willie Cries for War. With his new-found fortune, the Marland Oil Company emerged. To celebrate his success, E.W. envisioned and built a stately home for his wife Mary Virginia. located at 1000 E. Grand on the eastern edge of the then 25-year-old Ponca City.

Oklahoma architect Soloman Layton designed the Italian Renaissance Revival mansion encompassing 16,500 square feet. The three-story residence included 22 rooms, and Oklahoma’s first indoor swimming pool. A red clay tile roof and Art and Crafts-inspired interior finishes and fixtures were also specified.

The construction of the home, by local contractor O.F. Keck, began in 1914, and the Marlands completed their move into the new home on Dec. 16, 1916. The cost was approximately $350,000.

The Marland’s were gracious hosts and held many social events in the couple’s East Grand mansion. In 1925, construction began on a new home on a hill overlooking Ponca City. Unfortunately, Mary Virginia passed away in June 1926 before the new home’s completion in 1928. That second home is now known as the Marland Mansion.

The stately home on East Grand had a few more owners after E.W. moved out.

  • In 1930, Dan Moran, New President of Marland Oil, and his wife Carolyn.
  • In 1940, Jay G. Paris, owner of Paris Furniture on Grand Avenue, and his wife Jessie.
  • In 1967, the city of Ponca City purchased the property.
  • In 1976, Marland’s Grand Home was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Friends of Marland’s Grand Home was established in 1997 to assist the City of Ponca City in the maintenance, restoration and preservation of this historic gem. In addition to showcasing original as well as period-appropriate furnishings, the Grand Home also houses three museums: Daughters of the American Revolution memorabilia, an impressive collection of Native American art and artifacts and the Miller Brothers 101 Ranch and Wild West Show memorabilia.

 

Latest Stories

Judge nixes return of coal moratorium

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A judge has dismissed a lawsuit from a coalition of states, environmental...

Federal prison system to begin moving nearly 7K inmates

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal Bureau of Prisons will begin moving about 6,800 inmates from local...

Judge rules against Fort Sill Apache casino in New Mexico

MESCALERO, N.M. (AP) — A federal judge has ruled against the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of...